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Software Engineering at Google ebook available for free

Today I noticed the following announcement in my news feed:

The digital HTML version of the “Software Engineering at Google” book curated by Titus Winters, Tom Manshreck and Hyrum Wright is now available for free.

This book talks specifically about the software engineering practices and how it is a lot more than programming.

The short summary from the O’Reilly website:

Today, software engineers need to know not only how to program effectively but also how to develop proper engineering practices to make their codebase sustainable and healthy. This book emphasizes this difference between programming and software engineering.

How can software engineers manage a living codebase that evolves and responds to changing requirements and demands over the length of its life? Based on their experience at Google, software engineers Titus Winters and Hyrum Wright, along with technical writer Tom Manshreck, present a candid and insightful look at how some of the world’s leading practitioners construct and maintain software. This book covers Google’s unique engineering culture, processes, and tools and how these aspects contribute to the effectiveness of an engineering organization.

You’ll explore three fundamental principles that software organizations should keep in mind when designing, architecting, writing, and maintaining code:

  • How time affects the sustainability of software and how to make your code resilient over time
  • How scale affects the viability of software practices within an engineering organization
  • What trade-offs a typical engineer needs to make when evaluating design and development decisions

 

I didn’t have time to read it yet, but is certainly one I’m going to add to my reading list.

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