Tuesday, November 22, 2016

SQL Server Extension for VS Code

Yesterday I discovered the following great extension for VS Code: mssql.

From the marketplace:

An extension for developing Microsoft SQL Server, Azure SQL Database and SQL Data Warehouse everywhere with a rich set of functionalities, including:

  • Connect to Microsoft SQL Server, Azure SQL Database and SQL Data Warehouses.
  • Create and manage connection profiles and most recently used connections.
  • Write T-SQL script with IntelliSense, T-SQL snippets, syntax colorizations, T-SQL error validations and GO batch separator.
  • Execute the script.
  • View the result in a slick grid.
  • Save the result to json or csv file format and view in the editor.
  • Customizable extension options including command shortcuts and more.

Installation

  • To install it, open Visual Studio Code
  • Open the Extension tab by hitting ctrl-shift-x
  • On the Extension tab, search for ‘mssql’

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  • Click on the Install button. After the installation has completed, click on the Reload button to activate the extension.

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Connecting to SQL Server

  • Oa new text file (ctrl+n) and change the language mode to SQL by pressing ctrl+k,m and select SQL.

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  • mssql commands and funtionalities are enabled in the SQL language mode in Visual Studio Code editor.

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  • Create a new connection profile using command palette by pressing F1, type sqlman to run MS SQL: Manage Connection Profile command.

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  • Select Create. Follow the steps and specify a server name, database name and authentication type.

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  • The created connection profile is already selected. If you want to connect to another database, press F1 and type sqlcon to run MS SQL: Connnect command, then select a connection profile.

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  • Write T-SQL script in the editor using IntelliSense and Snippets. Type sql in the editor to list T-SQL Snippets.

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  • Execute T-SQL script or selection of statements in the script by pressing F1 and type sqlex to run MS SQL: Execute Query command. You can also use a shortcut (ctrl+shift+e).
  • View the T-SQL script execution results and messages in result view.

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